Business owners irked by Britton construction delays

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Business owners irked by Britton construction delays

Thu, 11/07/2019 - 20:47
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Village business owners expressed their concerns to the city council after the road project to reconstruct Britton Road between Penn and May Avenue has caused them to close their business.
Johnnie’s Charcoal Broiler owners Rick and David Haynes said business at their restaurant, located on Britton Road, has dropped 50 percent. He said when traffic was directed from May Avenue to Penn Avenue, business only dropped about 20 percent, but when Britton Road is closed, business declines.
In the meantime, the owners closed the restaurant for remodeling.
“We can’t afford to be shut down another six months,” Haynes said. “It’s frustrating for us on what to do and how to respond.”
Haynes said when he drives by the reconstruction project at least once a week, he only sees about five people working on the road at a time, which is irritating. He said he doesn’t understand why the city can’t push the Department of Transpor-tation to get the project done.
Haynes spoke with an ODOT representative and was told that although the project was initially scheduled to be completed Friday, Nov. 15, they have now pushed back the completion date to the end of November or later.
“Everyone along that street needs to be told when they are going to finish the project and why,” he said.
Haynes plans to attend a meeting with ODOT, The Village representatives, engineers and contractors to get answers about the project’s completion.
Mayor Cathy Cummings said she is also frustrated with the reconstruction and hopes to receive an update on road progression. Britton Road has a traffic count of about 22,000 cars per day.
In other city business, Pat Lewis, OG&E City of The Village liaison, discussed the addition of LED lights to the city.
“OG&E rates are the lowest in the United States,” Lewis said. “Hopefully it brings economic development to the state of Oklahoma and our customers.”
He said as OG&E continues to transition to LED lights, which are brighter and offer less light pollution, they need the community’s cooperation and patience when changing lights. Switching to LED lighting is a five-year process that Lewis said takes time as crews change the voltage and circuits that may have 15 or 50 lights on the same circuit.
“We appreciate everyone’s patience on streetlights,” he said. “Continue to call in and let us know when a light is out in your area.”